Christmas and New Year demand.

Demand for Guernsey’s Emergency Ambulance Service over the Christmas and New Year period remained in line with the daily average number of calls for the rest of 2020.

The St John Emergency Ambulance Service responded to 132 calls between Christmas Eve and New Year’s Day and while there were some periods of high demand during that time, the average number of calls remained similar to the overall average for the year. Crews responded to 20 calls on Christmas Day and two off-duty clinicians were called in to help maintain resilience during busy periods at either end of the day.

Chief Ambulance Officer, Mark Mapp said: “I would like to thank everyone who has worked over the festive period, especially those who were away from their families on Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve. I am also grateful to the off-duty team members who made themselves available to return to the ambulance station during busy periods of demand.”

Overall St John Emergency Ambulance Service responded to almost 5800 calls in 2020 which is only slightly up on the total for 2019.

“I don’t think anyone could have predicted the way 2020 would pan out. The coronavirus pandemic has shaped much of the year and it has not been without some challenges but we adapted quickly and have coped very well with the unprecedented circumstances of the Covid-19 pandemic. The Emergency Ambulance Service worked closely with Public Health, HSC and other States Departments from the outset. There were changes to the way we operated around the lockdown period with the use of PPE, satellite stations away from the Rohais and a buddy system for crews. Although generally operations have returned to normal, there are still some situations where clinicians will wear face masks and aprons. We have been providing support throughout 2020 to the Bailiwick islands and other crown dependencies.“ Mr Mapp added.

Between 3rd January and 6th January the St John Emergency Ambulance Service responded to 80 calls, which included an injured patient on the rocks at Chouet Bay who was given initial treatment on the beach before being carried off the rocks to a waiting ambulance for transport to hospital. Other incidents during this period included a call for the Flying Christine III to Sark and a road traffic collision where a motorcyclist was taken to hospital.